Evaluation and Outcome – FJCs

Singing About Your Successes – Petrucci – 2013
Dr. Carrie Petrucci, MSW, PhD, Senior Research Associate at EMT Associates, will discuss the importance of data collection in a Family Justice Center or similar service delivery model and will provide an overview of the mixed methods approach to evaluating the California Family Justice Initiative. Dr. Petrucci will discuss the why and the how of data collection and how to incorporate both quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis in assessing a Family Justice Center or other types of multi-agency service delivery models.

Webinar Course Materials Webinar Recording


The Impact of Camp HOPE on Children Exposed to Domestic Violence – University of Oklahoma 
The purpose of these reports are to present the evaluation results of the impact of Camp HOPE on children’s hope, and the three central themes of the Camp HOPE intervention model with children exposed to domestic violence; namely, defining hope as believing in themselves, believing in others, and believing they will achieve their dreams (resiliency).

2015 Material – 2014 Material – 2014 Counselor Material


Alameda County Family Justice Center Report – David-Lockyer – 2008
Compiled by the Alameda County Family Justice Center in June of 2008, this report addresses the key outcomes achieved by the ACFJC and requests support for AB 2231, legislation described as crucial to the FJC’s ability to continue to develop their innovative model.

 

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Crystal Judson Family Justice Center 2009 Annual Report – Tacoma – 2009
Created by the Crystal Judson Family Justice Center of Tacoma Washington in 2009, the Annual Report provides some statistical information about the services provided at the center in 2009, the revenue, funders, and volunteers. It also includes client testimonials, a letter from the Director and Board of Chairs, and more.


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Evaluability Assessment of the Presidents Family Justice Center Initiative – Townsend, Hunt & Rhodes -2005
Written by Meg Townsend, Dana Hunt, and William Rhodes, and published in September of 2005, this report briefly summarizes relevant site status information regarding the President’s Family Justice Center Initiative, links the program’s logic model to the evaluation design, and measures the program’s processes and impact.

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Executive Summary of the California Family Justice Initiative Statewide Evaluation – 2013
This Executive Summary of the 2013 evaluation report created by EMT Associates assessed the benefits of co-location of services and agency professionals to meet the needs of victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. The study also identified barriers or challenges to the effectiveness of the multi-agency, multi-disciplinary service model known as the Family Justice Center. Funding for this evaluation was graciously provided by Blue Shield of California Foundation.

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Nampa Family Justice Center Annual Report – Nampa FJC – 2010
This report documents the outcomes, achievements and statistics of the Nampa Family Justice Center for 2010.

 

 

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Nampa FJC 2010 Outcome Evaluation – Bostaph – 2010
Prepared by Lisa Growette Bostaph, Ph.D in January 2010, this report is the second outcome evaluation report of the Nampa Family Justice Center (NFJC). The overall purpose of this report is to determine if the NFJC and the criminal justice system is achieving its stated goal to expand current projects involving police, prosecutors, and non-profit victim advocacy groups regarding the investigation and prosecution of domestic violence and “centralize and coordinate” criminal justice system response to domestic violence. It details the results of the outcome study undertaken from a systemic perspective. The report provides a brief overview of the methodology used, followed by the findings and a discussion of the study’s results.

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Nampa FJC Process and Outcome Evaluation – Giacomazzi et al – 2008
Prepared by Boise State University professors, Andrew Giacomazzi, Elizabeth Hannah, and Lisa Bostaph, and published in May of 2008, this study assesses the process and short-term effects of the Nampa Family Justice Center. The study focuses on the following areas: (1) the extent of collaboration among co-located agency partners in the center; (2) the extent to which the services provided by the NFJC can be considered comprehensive; (3) efforts to increase victim access to NFJC services; (4) the extent of formal coordination and co-location of victim services; and (5) efforts to increase community awareness of the NFJC. Additionally, the researchers created a baseline population from all clients seen at the NFJC during October and November, 2006. A description of the Center, the methodology used, and the results of the evaluation are also included in the study.

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Nonprofits as Pathways of Hope – University of Oklahoma – Hellman
Created by Dr. Chan Hellman at the University of Oklahoma at Tulsa, this PowerPoint presentation highlights Hope Theory and argues that HOPE is a fundamental process that must be activated in order to engage in behavioral change. Hellman presents the outcomes of OU studies to exemplify that a common factor among the various services that non-profits provide to their clients is that they all provide hope.

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Presidents Family Justice Center Initiative Best Practices – OVW – 2007
Created by the Office on Violence Against Women in February of 2007, this document provides an overview of the Family Justice Center Model, and identifies the Best Practices as defined under the President’s Family Justice Center Initiative.

 

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Research Study that Identifies a Way to Document Hope for Funders – Hellman – 2012
This 2012 article discusses the HOPE Index and the work of Oklahoma University researcher Chan Hellman. Professor Hellman’s groundbreaking work is focused on measuring the impact of hope in the lives of victims of trauma and abuse through objective and subjective measurements. The Alliance’s HOPE Project, focused on developing a camping and mentoring model, for survivors of family violence and their children is seeking to use the HOPE Index to measure and document the increase in hope and related actions toward healing and empowerment in the lives of survivors and their children after being supported by a mentor and experiencing a special camping experience.

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The First Twenty Years of the Will and the Ways: An Examination of Score Reliability Distribution on Snyder’s Dispositional Hope Scale – Hellman, Pittman, & Munoz – 2012
This study presents a reliability generalization on both the internal consistency and test-retest reliability estimates from C. R. Snyder’s dispositional hope scale. While over 300 published works were found to have cited the target article 74 present internal consistency scores and 17 reported scores for test-retest reliability. The results of the reliability generalization suggest support for the score reliabilities produced by the dispositional hope scale.

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Taking Action to stop Violence – Hellman, Johnson & Dobson – 2010
The Transtheoretical Model of Change (TTM) predicts that matching interventions with a person’s readiness to change should improve treatment outcomes. This cross-sectional correlational study examined characteristics that affected self-reported readiness to change abusive behavior among a sample of 109 men in a 52-week batterer treatment program. Participants completed measures of anger/hostility, readiness to change, manipulative parenting, and self-esteem. Results indicated that contemplation of the impact of abuse has the highest unique relationship with self-reported taking action to stop violence. Moreover, physical aggression and manipulative parenting account for significant variance in the scores associated with self-reported taking action to stop violence as well. These findings suggest that interventions aimed at moving clients into contemplation, and reducing physical aggression and manipulative parenting styles, may increase the likelihood that batterers will take action to stop violence.

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The Family Justice Center Collaborative Model – Gwinn et al & St Louis University Public Law Review – 2007
Created by Casey Gwinn, Gael Strack, Susan Adams, Rebecca Lovelace, and Deborah Norman, and published in the Saint Louis University Public Law Review in March of 2008, this article explains the Family Justice Center collaborative model and documents the compelling history of the FJC movement. It details a closer look at three Family Justice Centers, the Nampa Family Justice Center (ID); the Crystal Judson Family Justice Center (Tacoma, WA); and the St. Louis Family Justice Center (MO) while also providing information about the role of the National Family Justice Center Alliance.

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Through the Eyes of Survivors: An Exploration of the SDFJC – Gibson – 2008
Written by Katherine F. Gibson in 2008, this clinical dissertation explores the experiences of survivors of intimate partner violence within a “one-stop-shop” for domestic violence. Specifically, this study evaluates the San Diego from the perspective of staff and survivors of intimate partner violence. Semi-structured interviews are used to qualitatively evaluate the experiences of survivors who have utilized the San Diego FJC. Particular consideration is given to whether and how survivors felt empowered by their experience, any relevant cultural factors, and how readiness for change affects service utilization. This study examines what makes the San Diego FJC work and what challenges the FJC may face.

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