Lethality Assessment & High-Risk Response

Lethality Assessment Protocol in Rochester, NH – Frechette & Wall – 2010
Created by Detective Bob Frechette, Paula Wall, and the National Family Justice Center Alliance in October of 2010, this Webinar discusses the Lethality Assessment Protocol (LAP) used in Rochester, New Hampshire and adapted from the Maryland LAP.  The Maryland LAP is a model for connecting survivors of domestic violence with confidential advocacy.  The Webinar highlights how the protocol is implemented throughout New Hampshire and the positive results it has brought to Strafford County.

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Prevention through Foresight Using Threat Assessments – Fairweather & Alliance- 2012
Lynn Fairweather, MSW, from Presage Consulting and Training will discuss the application of threat assessment and management techniques to high-risk domestic abuse cases. Lynn will also delve into the topic of intimate partner homicide and some of the factors that can warn of future risks. She will also explore the role of Family Justice Centers and other community-based collaborative service models in preventing violent attacks, and discuss what kind of assessment tools are available to help. The webinar will include information about safety planning, protection orders, and offender management.  At the conclusion of the training, multi-disciplinary family violence professionals will be provided with the necessary knowledge and tools to successfully implement safety planning and risk assessment for clients.  This session is approved for 1 CEU.

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MOSAIC Method – Martin-2009
Presented by Captain Robert Martin (Ret.), Vice President and Managing Principal of Gavin de Becker and Associates, this webinar explores MOSAIC, a threat assessment method. Though not itself a computer program, MOSAIC is delivered using computer technology to efficiently teach, guide, and carry out the assessment method. MOSAIC helps threat assessment practitioners assess threats; it does not itself assess a case. In addition to being an assessment method, MOSAIC is a training tool that has been evolving for over 20 years and provides the following: 1)Expert guidance.  In each case, MOSAIC shows how leading experts would assess a situation and what result they would likely reach on the basis of the information provided. 2) MOSAIC provides a shared language that eliminates variations in multiple assessments creating consistency within decision making and safety protocols. 3)MOSAIC offers the ability to print a written report describing the assessment in detail including personalized text expressing issues as needed. 4) MOSAIC also displays how much information has been entered and how much is necessary for a quality assessment.

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Domestic Violence High-Risk Team Model- Alliance
Research has shown that intimate partner domestic violence homicides are often predictable; and if they’re predictable, they’re preventable. The Jeanne Geiger Crisis Center’s Domestic Violence High-Risk Team (DVHRT) Model leverages that predictability by incorporating evidence-based risk assessment into a community’s domestic violence response system to identify cases at high risk of lethality.  Once identified, individual cases are then monitored by a multidisciplinary team that shares case information and implements case-specific intervention plans to mitigate the danger. The DVHRT Model focuses on increasing both victim safety and offender accountability. By focusing on the highest risk cases, the DVHRT intervenes in incidents with the most severe potential consequences while improving the quality and cohesion of the entire domestic violence response system. This presentation will provide a comprehensive understanding of the DVHRT Model with an overview of the research at its foundation. The function and structure of key partners in this multidisciplinary approach will be discussed. Participants will learn how team members work together to identify high-risk cases and mobilize risk management strategies.

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Domestic Violence High Risk Case Protocol – Alliance- 2010
Developed by the Family Justice Center Alliance in 2010, this protocol serves to identify how each discipline that works with domestic violence victims should respond to a high-risk case. The protocol specifically details the appropriate steps each discipline should take in response to such a case, and how family violence professionals should work together to provide immediate, wraparound services to high-risk victims.

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Danger Assessment- Campbell- 2005
The Danger Assessment (DA) was originally developed by Co-Investigator Campbell (1986) with consultation and content validity support from battered women, shelter workers, law enforcement officials, and other clinical experts on battering. The second part of the Danger Assessment is this 20-item instrument which uses a weighted scoring system to count yes/no responses of risk factors associated with intimate partner homicide. Some of the risk factors women are asked about are whether or not their partner owns a gun, their partner’s employment status, whether or not he has ever threatened to kill the woman, etc. The training module, offered at www.dangerassessment.org, provides training on how to score the tool and offers score interpretations and recommendations for the different score levels. This tool is available in English, French Canadian, Portuguese, and Spanish.

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Danger Assessment Calendar- Campbell- 2016
The Danger Assessment (DA) was originally developed by Co-Investigator Campbell (1986) with consultation and content validity support from battered women, shelter workers, law enforcement officials, and other clinical experts on battering. The first portion of the measure assesses severity and frequency of battering by presenting the woman with a calendar of the past year. The woman is asked to mark the approximate days when physically abusive incidents occurred, and to rank the severity of the incident on a 1 to 5 (1=slap, pushing, no injuries and/or lasting pain through 5=use of weapon, wounds from weapon) scale. The calendar portion was conceptualized as a way to raise the consciousness of the woman and reduce the denial and minimization of the abuse, especially since using a calendar increases accurate recall in other situations (Campbell, 1995; Ferraro et al., 1983). In the original scale development, 38% of women who initially reported no increase in severity and frequency, changed their response to “yes” after filling out the calendar (Campbell, 1986; Campbell, 1995).

The training module, offered at www.dangerassessment.org, provides training on how to score the tool and offers score interpretations and recommendations for the different score levels.

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